What to see and expect at Batu Caves.

The Batu Caves is probably one of the most popular tourist spots in Malaysia. Easily accessible from Kuala Lumpur central, this magnificent work-of-man is a soaring proof of how much religion can affect us as a whole. Two other attractions are also found here (dark cave and ramayana cave), which makes it a must visit if you’re off to Malaysia. Just a tip before you go, though: prepare your legs for some serious stair climbing.

Once you arrive here, you will immediately be welcomed by the towering statue of Murugan (a hindu diety) and along with it, a painfully long staircase leading to the Batu temple caves. Looking at the tourists climbing the stairs is tiring enough; wait for your turn to actually climb the stairs. Fun fact: the staircase is made up of 272 steps. No big deal.

To warm us up, we went first to the Ramayana cave. The cave is very easy to spot, just make your way through the exit of Batu caves station, then turn left.

A fee of 5RM (1.27$) will be collected prior to your entry to the Ramayana cave. A bronze chariot will be there to welcome you to the cave’s entrance, along with a semi-gigantic (because it’s not as big as the statue of Murugan) statue of Kumbhakarna.

If you’re in for legends and epics, this cave would be worth every penny. Inside the cave, is the narrated Indian epic Ramayana. You are probably wondering how the cave narrates the epic. Well, numerous figurines are placed all over the cave. A set of figurines depict a particular event in the epic, along with a brief description for you to read. All of which is compiled in order to beautifully illustrate the Indian epic.

You also have the option to climb the stairs leading to the upper part of the cave. Not much is seen there though, save for the view of the whole cave from above. Still, it’s a great warm up exercise for the main event: the stairway leading to Batu Caves temple. We spent a couple of minutes at the top to catch our breath, and also to take a selfie here and there. After climbing down the stairs, we decided to take our lunch to prepare ourselves for another stair-climbing.

We took our lunch at the Restoran Amutha. We ordered an unbelievably cheap Nasi Goreng. Don’t be skeptical about the price though, because food in Malaysia is relatively cheap compared to other countries. Here, you will get a fairly decent meal for 10RM (2.54$). If you are tightening your budget, you can still lower it to 5 RM (1.27$). I don’t recommend that though, as traveling comes with tasting the food of the place you are visiting. Tasting their food is knowing their culture. Knowing their culture is immersing yourself in their country.

Now that we’re all geared up, we are more than ready to climb the stairs going to Batu Caves. Once we reached the foot of the staircase, there are Indians monitoring the tourist’s attire who wish to enter the caves. Apparently, women are not allowed to wear shorts inside the cave (Men are allowed, which is a relief on my part). They would have to rent additional clothing similar to a sarong to wrap around their waste so as to cover their legs. None of which is our concern, so we just went straight for the stairs.

Caution: Monkeys are abundant in Batu Caves. Please refrain from bringing food and other objects that might actually catch the monkey’s attention. Once they grab your things, it will be very difficult to have them release it.

After about 15 minutes of exercise, we finally reached the top. And yes, I would use this unoriginal statement once more: THE VIEW AT THE TOP MADE ALL THE TROUBLE WORTH IT. The stalactites juttering from the entrance of the cave makes such an epic portrait combined with the plants clinging to it.

Souvenir shops line near the cave’s entrance. Here, you can buy miniature statues of Murugan- the landmark of Batu caves.

There is a temple at the far end of the cave, as well as a beautiful cave opening which allows little sunlight to enter. At the right angle, you will see how the sun rays perfectly complement the temple inside the cave. It looks as if the rays are embracing the temple.

Our last stop is the Dark Cave. The Dark Cave is somehow an educational and awareness tour. The entrance fee is a little bit pricey at 35RM (8.88$) but it’s always up to you if you wanted to experience it or not. I still went for it though (I think you should, too), because it’s not everyday that we go to Batu caves. Better make the most out of it.

I was not disappointed. The Dark Cave is an experience unique from the others. At the end of the tour, I’ve been equipped with a deep knowledge about the cave’s ecosystem, and a deeper urge for its conservation. If you wish to know more about the Dark cave and its advocacies, visit their website here.

Several photos taken at the Dark cave:

Batu Caves Tips:

-Watch out for those monkeys! Take a picture, but not too close! There are reported cases of monkeys grabbing a tourist’s camera.

-Girls, wear pants or bring them if you’re wearing shorts. Borrowing a sarong is not free, better save up those cash for the nightmarkets.

-Sign up first for the Dark Cave. The entrance to the Dark Cave comes in batches (every 45 mins). Make sure to reserve your slot first, then go on exploring the other parts of the temple cave.

Expenses:

– 5RM (1.27$) for the Entrance to Ramayana Cave

– 35RM (8.88$) for the entrance to the Dark Cave

– 10RM (2.54$) for the food

How to get there:

– Ride any train bound for KL Central.

-Alight at KL Central.

– From KL Central, board the train bound for Batu Caves.

– Alight at the last stop: Batu Caves.

Whether you’re in an arranged tour or not, one thing is for sure: you will enjoy your stay at Batu caves. So, if by any chance you decided to go to Malaysia, make sure to pay this place a visit. The great statue of Murugan will be always there, waiting for your arrival. Happy traveling guys!

Can’t get enough of Malaysia? Then check out my travel guide: Malaysia by clicking HERE.

-Carlo, WHT.

Comments

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      Carlo Tuzon

      It is! The huge statue of Murugan took 3 years to make, claiming its rightful place as the number 1 tallest statue in Malaysia. It’s also second tallest Murugan statue in the whole world next to Nepal. Thanks for stopping by, Coral! I hope you had a great time reading my post. πŸ™‚

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          Carlo Tuzon

          Oh, sorry. My apologies. Thanks again for the tip. I will look it up before I post new articles- to give a brief history about each of the places I will be visiting. Your suggestion is highly appreciated. It is a great help for me in order to grow my audience. Cheers!!

  1. Suyash

    Hey there your blog is awesome
    Maybe you can think of me joining with you
    If you ever come in Maharashtra, India be sure to contact me
    I trek a lot here in the sahyadri mountain range .Or maybe you could help me set my own travelling blog…
    Pls think about it

    1. Post
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      Carlo Tuzon

      Hi Suyash! Thank you for the highly encouraging comment! I would love to do that! Maybe a year from now I’ll go there and contact you. I would love to explore India. Regarding your traveling blog, I must say that I am also new to blogging, but I’ll make sure to give you all the things I learned about travel blogging.

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          Carlo Tuzon

          Earnings through self hosted sites always boil down to one thing: traffic. You must meet first the minimum traffic requirement of 1000 views per month to be eligible for wordads.

  2. Post
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    Carlo Tuzon

    Sorry Suyash, but I just migrated my site to a self hosted one a couple of weeks ago. That was the only time I was able to apply for wordads, and up until now I am waiting for a confirmation email from wordads. I hope I was able to help. πŸ˜‰

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      Carlo Tuzon

      It is! I am not a professional photographer though- all of my shots were only taken by an action cam. But of course, I try my best to get the best snaps. All the best Trish! Thanks for stopping by. πŸ˜‰

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          Carlo Tuzon

          HAHAHAHAHAHAHAH Hey! I think that’s a great idea! Everyone has their own way of doing things, to be fair. πŸ˜‚ maybe you can collect receipts of the mcd’s all around the world, and have it posted in a “Mcd’s all around the world” wall or something. Maybe you’ll even be featured at a TV show. Who knows? πŸ‘Œ

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            Carlo Tuzon

            Oh, I see! Thanks. I did not know that. I’ll look it up to review myself of the details. It would be fascinating to know the whole story of Murugan. Thanks for stopping by! And for urging me to know more about Murugan. πŸ™‚

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